simple science activities

Dancing Buttons Fairy Water Science Experiment – Fairy Activities #18

This dancing buttons fairy water science experiment is a twist on the popular dancing raisins activity. It’s fun to try something a little different.fairy water science experiment for kids

Raisins dance up and down in clear soda pop. We’re used to seeing things sink in water or float, but not usually both. The bubbles in the soda carry the raisins up. When the bubbles all pop, the raisins sink back down. We called the soda pop fairy water and tried some different items.Halloween science for kids

There were some shiny sequin shapes left-over from our fairy play dough fun. First, we had to check if they would sink in plain, ordinary tap water. When we placed them flat on the water in a jar, they floated but when we dropped them in sideways they would sink and stay on the bottom. Now that we knew they would float, we were ready to try them in the fairy water. Big Brother and Little Sister said they would float. Big Sister said they would do both. Baby Brother was napping and didn’t express his hypothesis, even though he has plenty of opinions at other times.fairy water science experiment for kids

When we dropped the sequin shapes in the fairy water, they stayed on the top. The only way they would sink even a little bit was if we stirred them and poked them. So then we tried buttons. The kids looked thru the button box and choose 5 small ones each. We checked in the plain tap water that they would sink. They did. We talked about what would happen in the fairy water. Although the kids thought they would float, I suggested they might be too heavy. We put in all 15 buttons at once.

fairy water science experiment for kids
What a show! The buttons danced up and down and up and down. We watched them for the longest time and checked on them periodically after that. After about 15 minutes, there were fewer bubbles so the sequin shapes would sink a little if we poked them. It took longer for the bubbles to build up enough for the buttons to rise but there was still action.

fairy water science experiment for kids

Simple science activities can be such fun. We’ve added a variation to the raisins to make our own dancing buttons fairy water science experiment. Any suggestions for what we can try next?

 

For more fairy activities, come and play on the 123kindergarten blog.

 

Magic Milk Swirling Color Science Experiment – Fairy Activities #13

The Google doodle for Oskar Fischinger was a swirl of color, shapes, and sounds; it inspired this visual magic milk swirling color science experiment. The sound was our squeals of wonder as we watched the art-in-action in a dish. Usually, this magic milk swirling color science experiment is done with red, blue, and yellow food coloring. When coloring Easter eggs, we used up the blue and yellow. Somewhere in the cupboard there is a brand new box but all we could find was the old box with red and green.

magic milk swirling color science experiment

To start, pour a little bit of milk in a flat dish like a saucer or shallow, wide bowl. You will need milk with fat content, not skim. Someday, we want to try this using cream to see if there is a difference. Carefully squeeze in a couple drops of each color in different spots. At this point, kids really want to mix the colors. Instead, talk about what might happen, then watch. What does happen? Do the colors move or mix? There isn’t much going on.

<img class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-21954" src="http://123kindergarten.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/milk-color-1-300x225.jpg" alt="magic milk swirling color science experiment" width="300" height="225" />

Squirt a couple drops of liquid dish soap into a small lid. We use soap to wash hands and dishes; will the soap wash the colors? Dip a q-tip into the soap and then dip it into the middle (more or less) of the puddle of milk and color. Take the q-tip right out. No stirring needed. The colors start to tumble, mix, swirl, and dance on their own. Is that what the colors did before using the bit of soap? What made the difference? There’s lots to talk and wonder about now. The action just keeps happening, almost as if it’s magic.

magic milk swirling colors science experiment

After watching this for a bit, kids just have to stir with the q-tip. Of course, the colors really do mix now to make a muddy pool. Who could resist?magic milk swirling colors science experiment

Did we need fairy dust for this magic milk swirling color science experiment? Nope, just a little soap added to the milk and color. There is a scientific explanation involving how molecules breakdown and combine, but to the eyes it looks like magic. Once done stirring, it’s easy to wash up with the dish soap. What other magic can soap do?

No need for a magic wand for play activities; come back to the play-of-the-day on 123kindergarten.com.

 

Mayhem & Messy Play #3: Mixing Colors Messy Play Science Experiment

Messy play doesn’t have to cover the whole house; this mixing colors messy play science experiment was limited to the kitchen table but the play wasn’t.messy play color science

Recently, with a record amount of rainfall in our area, we’ve had a few rainbows. This inspired our rainbow activity. Have you seen the science experiments with colors and water that moves from one glass to another on a paper towel road? It’s really exciting and kids can watch the action. Here’s how we did it:

messy play color scienceFirst, we placed 6 clear glasses in a circle. We filled 3 of them with water and squirted a couple of drops of different food coloring in each one. There was one glass of red, yellow, and blue. The other 3 glasses were empty. Big Sister said she thought the water would transfer from the full glasses to the empty ones all around. When I asked Little Sister what she thought might happen, she didn’t answer the question but volunteered to mix up all the colors.messy play color scienceThe next step is the double magic. We folded a length of paper towel and placed one end in a glass of colored water and the other end in an empty one next to it on both sides. We repeated this until we had what looks like 6 bridges, linking all the glasses. When we placed the paper towel in the red glass, it started moving down the dry end of the paper towel immediately.messy play color science

Before we’d even finished folding and putting in all the bridges, the water from the red glass was already dripping into the empty one. When they were all done, it only took a couple of minutes for the water level to start creeping up in the empty glasses.

messy play color science

Not only did the water transfer from the full glasses to the empty ones, but the colors mixed too. And it didn’t take long at all. From starting with the 3 colors of red, yellow and blue, there were now all 6 with orange, green, and purple. In the photo, there isn’t much difference between the red and the orange but it was more noticeable looking from the side.

messy play color science

Little Sister very much wanted to mix the colors. With an eye dropper she got bits of colored water from each glass and squirted in the others. The paper towels were in her way so she put them in a bowl. After squirting and mixing for a few minutes, the colors were certainly messy.

messy play color scienceAt this point, she used the paper towels to soak up the water in the glasses and squeezed the water out into the bowl. Now there was a messy concoction of towel and brown-grey water, beyond the original intention of this mixing colors messy play science experiment.messy play color science

Big Sister was more interested in the science experiment aspect. Little Sister was simply experimenting to see what she could make happen by squirting and squeezing. When both were done, clean-up was pretty quick. The value of the play was different for each of them, but it was fun and learning for all of us, me included. Can this mixing colors messy play science experiment inspire some messy play and learning for your child?

Can you come out and play?

Tomorrow, we’ll do another messy play activity so come play.

Science Learning Fun – Magic for Early Programs, Preschool and Kindergarten #9

Science learning fun is a super wish for early programs for kids. Science is part of school for older kids, but younger kids love science too. It’s more than another subject, it’s like a setting or channel in the brain for interacting with the world. This series of blog posts is inspired by parents and … Continue reading Science Learning Fun – Magic for Early Programs, Preschool and Kindergarten #9

Easter Egg Magnet Science Fun – Quite An Attraction

Plastic Easter eggs and some small bits from the junk drawer combined for Easter egg magnet science fun and it was quite an attraction for wee hands.Do you have a drawer in the kitchen to hold all the assorted bits and pieces that don’t go anywhere else? While often called the junk drawer, these things … Continue reading Easter Egg Magnet Science Fun – Quite An Attraction

Easter Egg Float-Sink Science Fun for a Play-of-the-Day

A good chunk of our afternoon was in the kitchen, not baking but at the sink with hands in warm water, for some Easter egg float-sink science fun. A winner! Do you have a junk drawer in the kitchen? We do and this experiment starts with hunting in the stuff for small items that will … Continue reading Easter Egg Float-Sink Science Fun for a Play-of-the-Day

February Friendship #8: Kids Can Be Friends with Science

Instead of kids can be friends with science, maybe this should be adults can be. Kids are always exploring and trying things out to see what happens. For us, kids’ science play isn’t such fun when we answer 300 questions a day or wait while a child throws double that number of rocks in the … Continue reading February Friendship #8: Kids Can Be Friends with Science

Dragon Vinegar Baking Soda Science Experiment – Foam Instead of Fire

No matter how many times we’ve combined these two ingredients, this dragon vinegar baking soda science experiment was still exciting. Be prepared though, once isn’t enough! The kids wanted to do some dragon science, but what to do? We needed an idea. The thinking process for some dragon science fun was long and winding. There … Continue reading Dragon Vinegar Baking Soda Science Experiment – Foam Instead of Fire

Pumpcano: Pumpkin Baking Soda Vinegar Volcano

Not only does this pumpkin baking soda vinegar volcano create a gas (carbon dioxide), it is a gas, as in lots of fun. It’s a great science experiment too. Although baking soda and vinegar are inexpensive, the bigger the pumpkin the more of it you will need. Smaller pumpkins are easier for the bubbles to … Continue reading Pumpcano: Pumpkin Baking Soda Vinegar Volcano

Scooping out a Pumpkin: Sensory and Science Play

Ooey, gooey, it’s time to look, listen, smell, feel (and maybe taste?) when scooping out a pumpkin. This is sensory fun, science play, and learning all at once. First, prepare the table or counter with some newspaper. Find a container to save the seeds and strings from the inside. Before cutting, look at the pumpkin … Continue reading Scooping out a Pumpkin: Sensory and Science Play